Dubai Golf Tournament: Interesting Facts

The DP World Tour Championship, Dubai is a golf tournament that takes place on the European Tour. It is the climax of the European Tour Race to Dubai.

It takes place in the month of November on the Earth course at the Jumeirah Golf Estates in Dubai, a major city of the United Arab Emirates.

The tournament is sponsored by DP World, a shipping company based in Dubai – hence the name.

History of the Tournament

It was first held in 2009, when the Race to Dubai replaced the Order of Merit.

It involves a contest of the 60 leading players in the Race to Dubai at the start of the tournament. In this way, it replaces the Volvo Masters, a similar event for the leading 60 money winners on the Order of Merit.

The original intention was to have a record prize fund of $10,000, with the winner’s share being $1,666,660. However, a 25% reduction in both the overall prize fun and the winner’s cheque was announced in September 2009. It was not until 2012 that the prize fund saw an increase to $8,000,000.

In addition, the tournament determines the Bonus Pool of the Race to Dubai, which goes to the top golfers on the Race to Dubai after the tournament. Though originally set at $10,000,000, it came down to $7,500,000 – paid to the top 15 players. The Race to Dubai winner gets $1.5 million.

In 2002, the bonus pool reduced by half to $3.75 million, and the money now only went to the top 10 golfers, and the winner received $1.0 million.

Past Winners of the Tournament

The following is a list of the players who have won the Dubai Golf tournament going back from 2017:

1. John Rahm (Spain) – 2017 (DP World Tour Championship, Dubai)

2. Matthew Fitzpatrick (England) – 2016 (DP World Tour Championship, Dubai)

3. Rory Mcllroy (Northern Ireland) – 2015 (DP World Tour Championship, Dubai)

4. Henrik Stenson (Sweden) – 2014 (DP World Tour Championship, Dubai)

5. Henrik Stenson (Sweden) – 2013 (DP World Tour Championship, Dubai)

6. Rory MCllroy (Northern Ireland) – 2012 (DP World Tour Championship, Dubai)

7. Álvaro Quirós (Spain) – 2011 (Dubai World Championship presented by DP World)

8. Robert Karlsson (Sweden) – 2010 (Dubai World Championship presented by DP World)

9. Lee Westwood (England) – 2009 (Dubai World Championship presented by DP World)

DP World Tour Championship 2017

John Rahm took the 2017 DP World Championship title with an astounding score of -19. For this feat, he took home 1,175,050 Euros (that is $1,395,109.19). Earlier in the year, Rahm had earned the tour’s Rookie of the Year award.

It’s quite an accomplishment, and Rahm can’t help but acknowledge that 2017 has been a good year for him, especially on the European tour – he has gone from not being a member last year to an affiliate, to European Tour champion, to Rolex Series Champion, to twice Rolex Series Champion, and finally the winner of the DP World Tour Championship.

While John Rahm won the DP World Championship title, it was Tommy Fleetwood that won the Race to Dubai, giving him the right to be called the top golfer in Europe. Fleetwood took home 944,000 pounds (that is $1,270,386.83).

Venue: Jumeirah Golf Estates in Dubai

The tournament is held on the Earth Course in the Jumeirah Golf Estates in Dubai, UAE. Dubai is the largest city in the United Arab Emirates. Though not the capital city, it might as well be since most people are more likely to know Dubai than the capital Abu Dhabi. Dubai is the most populous city in the UAE.

The city of Dubai is the capital of the Emirate of Dubai, one of the seven emirates of which the country is comprised. The Emirate has a Western-style business model, and this is a key driver of its economy.

Dubai is one of the most expensive cities in the world, and was in 2012 rated as the most expensive city in the Middle East. Its hotels were rated as the second most expensive worldwide in 2014. In 2013 it was rated as the best place to live in the Middle East.

The Jumeirah Golf Estates in Dubai are prestigious, residential golf developments that include a collection of individually designed homes within a picturesque landscape, enclosed inside a secure gated community.

There are two courses at the venue: the Fire Course and the Earth Course. The DP World Tour Championship is held at the latter. The Earth Course draws its inspiration from the great parkland courses you find in Europe and North America.

 It consists of rolling fairways, brilliant white bunkering, and a deep red ochre landscape, having many trees and shrubs. As such, it is an ideal location at which to hold a golf tournament.

The last 4 holes are played alongside or over water; a meandering creek runs the full length of the final hole.

Race to Dubai

The Race to Dubai replaced the Order of Merit in 2009. It also replaced the previous bonus pool of $10 million with $7.5 million, to be distributed among the top 15 players at the close of each season, the winner taking $1.5 million (it was originally $2 million).

The name was changed to reflect the addition of a new season ending tournament: the Dubai World Championship, which is the focus of this article.

As mentioned earlier, the tournament has a $7.5 million prize fund (it was originally $10 million), contested by the leading 60 player in the race following the season’s penultimate event, the Hong Kong Open.

The winner of the Race to Dubai gets a 10-year European Tour Exemption, while the Dubai Championship tournament winner gets 5-year exemption.

The reduction in prize money in 2009 was as a result of the global economic downturn. In 2012, there was even further reduction, with the bonus pool coming down to $3.7 million, where the winner got $1.0 million and only the top 10 golfers got a bonus.

In 2014, the bonus pool was increased to $5.0 million, with the top 15 players being entitled to part of the pool.

Final Words

The United States have the PGA Tour, and Europe has the European Tour. The most prestigious and respected golfers in Europe take part in the European Tour, competing in the Race to Dubai and the Dubai Championship Tournament.

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